Flying Aircraft
The Fargo Air Museum has a full roster of planes that FLY!

North American P-51D Mustang

North American P-51D Mustang

Called the “Mustang”, the P-51 is perhaps the best-known fighter of World War II. With its Rolls-Royce Merlin engine, the P-51 quickly became the war’s dominant fighter plane. It was though of as a “knight in shining armor” by the many bomber crews it escorted.

After the war, the P-51 remained in US service with the Strategic Air Command until 1949, and with the Air National Guard and Reserves into the 1950s. It became one of the first fighters to see combat in the Korean War. The RAF’s Fighter Command used them until 1946. In addition, over 50 air forces around the world acquired and used the Mustang for many more years, some as recently as the early 1980s. When the US Air Force realigned their aircraft designations in the 1950s, the Mustang became the F-51.


Velocity Fixed Wing Aircraft-HomeBuilt

Kirk and Diane Lindberg of Inner Grove Heights, MN donated their Velocity 1994 fixed gear aircraft to the museum on December 30, 2012. Kirk, Diane and their friend Jim were met by a group of EAA and museum members as they taxied up to the museum ramp door on Sunday.

Kirk and Diane shared stories about the 3,000 hours spent building their airplane, involvement with EAA, 1995 Osh Kosh Indy award, singing with the Roseville “Rosetones” quartet and traveling around the country with their “first born.”

The museum team wishes to express our gratitude to Kirk and Diane Lindberg for this impeccable airplane donation which will represent the general aviation “home built” segment.


Captain John Huls L-39

The Fargo Air Museum is honored to accept John Huls’ donation of a 1981 L-39 Aero Vodochody Jet Trainer. John said, “It is a nice flying machine that I bought from the Ukraine about 5 years ago, painted it and put in American instruments.” It was manufactured by Aero Vodochody in Prague, Czech Republic, for the Warsaw Pact Countries. It was one of 2800 that was produced to military standards, fully aerobatic and serves as an advanced trainer for future fighter pilots, including weapon delivery practicing, as well as for light attack tasks. The aircraft is a low-wing, tandem seating, all metal turbofan powered aircraft. Please visit the museum this summer for a special reception of John Huls’ L-39.


Chance-Vought F4U Corsair

Chance-Vought F4U Corsair

The Corsair was used by the Navy and Marines during World War II and the Korean War. Perhaps it is best known for its inverted gull wing. Its looks made it a star of the 1970s TV series “Baa Baa Black Sheep”.

This wonderfully aircraft was restored by the late Gerald S. Beck of Wahpeton, ND.


Grumman TBM Avenger

Grumman TBM Avenger

The Avenger became the Navy’s primary torpedo bomber aircraft. Its best-known pilot may be former President George Bush. Just over 30 Avengers still remain airworthy.

This wonderfully aircraft was restored by the late Gerald S. Beck of Wahpeton, ND.


Douglas DC-3/C-47 Skytrain

Douglas DC-3/C-47 Skytrain

The DC-3 “Duggy…The Smile in the Sky” airplane is often on display at the Fargo Air Museum. Duggy also travels to various air shows, special aviation events and education programs with the Robert Odegaard family. Perhaps best known as the “Gooney Bird”, the DC-3 was the primary aircraft transporting troops and equipment during World War II. DC-3s were used to tow the gliders and paratroops that were instrumental in the successful Allied invasion of France on D-Day. Visit Duggy at www.duggy.com


Cessna L-19/O-1 Bird Dog

Cessna L-19/O-1 Bird Dog

One of a long line of civilian light planes converted to military use (like the Taylor, Piper, and Stinson “Grasshoppers” of World War II fame), the Cessna L-19 “Bird Dog” observation and Forward Air Control aircraft traced its origins to the Cessna 170, a 4-place civilian light plane, with its military power upgraded from 145 to 213 hp.

 


Taylorcraft L-2

Taylorcraft L-2

Originally known as the YO-57, the Taylorcraft L-2 came from the commercial Taylorcraft Model D, and was one of a series of light aircraft used in the observation and liaison mission during World War II

 

 


PT-19

PT-19

The PT-19 began production in 1940 to be used as the US Army Air Corps’ primary trainer. More than 3,700 were built before 1942, when an engine change ended the PT-19′s run. The PT 19 is owned by Bonanzaville and is on loan to the museum.

Fargo Air Museum Events

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